The evolutionist wants to believe, not that he was not created, but that he created himself. The debate is thus misdirected between Creationists and Darwinists, for the Darwinist truly does believe in an intelligent design, despite all his smoke screen of talk about chance and survival of the fittest and so forth. The difference lies in whose design is intelligent: his own, or that of a Divine Master to whom he is accountable.

Did not fish, according to Darwin, decide to grow themselves some lungs and legs? The Darwinist wishes, in his deepest secret heart, to have chosen for himself to be, to have created his own existence, for that is the only way that he can be a god.

To be created is to have another who is greater than you, one to whom you are accountable for how you use the existence that you have been given. Even that element of “given”-ness is anathema to the Darwinist. To accept a gift, even the gift of life, is to be in some measure beholden to the giver. A true gift, of course, does not bring any debt save gratitude, yet even gratitude is too great a debt for the proud man, for it implies that another who is greater than you has shown you grace or mercy.

This would, in some measure, also extend to one’s biological parents, for they are the most immediate and obvious givers of one’s life. So the Darwinist, together with his Siamese twin the Freudian, has absolved himself of even the filial debt with his smoke screen of biological necessities and instincts and cravings and survival of the species, blowing it all so thick that no one can see clearly through the haze of amoral equivalencies.

The eternal hope of the Darwinist is not heaven but self-godhood, becoming one’s own god and answerable only to self.

Now, all this is bad enough, but far worse than the Darwinist is the so-called Christian evolutionist. This person is a true Laodicean, neutralized to vomitous luke-warmness by the mixture of hot and cold, Biblical Christianity and worldly paganism. He is so desperate to be accepted and respected and “cool” and “relevant” in the eyes of the world, so enamored of the world’s sophistry, that he attempts to embrace with one arm the false god of Darwinism without letting go of Jesus Christ with the other arm.

He is a double-minded man, serving two masters, simultaneously believing with whole heart two mutually exclusive ideas. For the foundation of Darwinism, the pebble on which it is built, is Death; while the Rock foundation of Christianity is Life.

Darwinism, the religion of Death, requires that death be present for its tenets to be feasible. A creature (that word itself is loaded, for creatures were created; therefore, the Darwinist never uses that word, preferring “life-form” as his Hitleresque euphemism) — the creature that supposedly changes — “evolves” or “adapts” in Darwinist jargon — does so simply in order to survive. Darwinist theologians do not preach that “adaptation” occurs because the creature wishes to thrive or to learn more or to advance himself in the world; they sermonize on the fallacy that a “species” is threatened with extinction and must grow wings or lungs or legs or tails if it is to survive.

The Bible, in contradiction, teaches that death did not exist on earth prior to Adam’s eating the forbidden fruit. This belief — that sin brought death into the world — is the imperative belief for Christianity. It is the basis of our most central tenet, that only Christ’s death could bring atonement for sin. If death already existed in any form prior to Adam’s sin, then Christ’s death becomes futile. He is the second Adam, the “Last Adam” according to Paul (1 Corinthians 15:45), and His sinless life paid the price for the first Adam’s sin-induced death.

In short, the Bible teaches clearly and repeatedly that Death did not exist on earth until Adam ate the fruit. This required both knowledge and free will. A horse commits no sin because it is not accountable for understanding the will of God, not capable of choosing between God’s will and self-will. Only a fully formed man is capable of this. That fully formed man was named Adam, and he was created in a moment by the command of God, created fully man and fully accountable.

Christian evolutionists adulterate themselves with the world by trying somehow to believe that God used Death to help Him create life. Only a pagan could believe that — a pagan and a Laodicean Christian.

  8 Responses to “Christian Darwinists”

  1. … until Adam ate the fruit. “This required both knowledge and free will.”

    If Adam had knowledge (of God’s will through God’s spoken commands or innately in his conscience) and his own free will (to choose whether to eat or not to eat), then there was no deception at all involved in Adam’s choice.

    I’ve always believed that he was deceived by the Devil (through his wife?). Your quote above seems to leave out the fact that Adam was deceived. Or that he was perhaps weak in his created nature. A creature too weak to live up to God’s commands to him.

    Of course, both of these (if he was deceived, or if he was too weak in his nature to do what was commanded) remove a level of responsibility from Adam, to my mind. I know you are making the opposite point here.

    I realize that may be a slippery slope, as we have spoken of before. Was Adam weak? Was Adam deceived? Did the Devil have anything to do with the Fall of Man?

    I cannot seem to see this clearly: That Adam had free will and full knowledge of the consequences of disobeying God. If he did, how could he choose to eat of the tree? Any explanation would beg that Adam had a flaw, a pride, a weakness, a failing, a sinful nature. Yet how could that be? Unless he was meant to Fall, perhaps?

    Maybe it had to happen, so God’s strength could replace our weakness and make a perfect plan of redemption for us in Christ.

    I really don’t know. But I’d like your opinion, and how I could better understand this.

    Randy

  2. For Adam was formed first, then Eve. And Adam was not deceived, but the woman being deceived, fell into transgression. (1 Timothy 2:13-14, NKJV)

    Adam was distinctly NOT deceived; it was Eve who was deceived. Adam also was not weak or imperfect in any way. He had complete freedom to choose for himself, coupled with a clear understanding of the consequences that would follow disobedience — and yet he still chose to disobey.

    Why did he do this? The answer is not far away; it’s found inside each one of us, since we are descended from Adam and therefore inherit his nature. “Like begets like,” so a sinful Adam can only produce sinful offspring.

    So I”m just like Adam. When I willfully sin, I do so knowing full well that I am sinning, understanding that sin always produces death — yet I still choose to sin. When I ask, “Why did Adam do such a thing?” I am really asking that question of myself.

    I find then a law, that evil is present with me, the one who wills to do good. For I delight in the law of God according to the inward man. But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members. O wretched man that I am! Who will deliver me from this body of death? I thank God–through Jesus Christ our Lord! So then, with the mind I myself serve the law of God, but with the flesh the law of sin. (Romans 7:21-25, NKJV)

    • Hi Greg,

      You state:
      “Adam also was not weak or imperfect in any way”

      Then You state:
      “Why did he do this? The answer is not far away; it’s found inside each one of us, since we are descended from Adam and therefore inherit his nature. “Like begets like,” so a sinful Adam can only produce sinful offspring.”

      That explains to me why I sin. But it doesn’t explain why Adam sinned. How could he sin if “Adam also was not weak or imperfect in any way”? I do not understand that.

      So I re-submit:
      “Or that he was perhaps weak in his created nature. A creature too weak to live up to God’s commands to him.”

      I don’t understand how he can be BOTH able to sin, and, as you say “”Adam also was not weak or imperfect in any way”.

      I had said:
      “I cannot seem to see this clearly: That Adam had free will and full knowledge of the consequences of disobeying God. If he did, how could he choose to eat of the tree? Any explanation would beg that Adam had a flaw, a pride, a weakness, a failing, a sinful nature.”

      Thoughts?

      Randy

      • This takes us back, once again, to the old mystery of man’s free will versus God’s sovereignty. How can God be completely in control of all things if man has the capacity to make his own decisions? If God makes all the decisions, then man’s free will does not exist; if man has the ability to choose his own future, then God is not completely in control.

        Or so it would seem from man’s logical perspective. Yet the truth is that both exist simultaneously — two things that are mutually contradictory, yet both true at the same time. This is beyond our capacity to understand.

        God created Adam with the ability to choose for himself whom he would serve: either God, through obedience; or self and the devil through disobedience. This free will was part of God’s creation, which He declared “very good,” so we know that Adam’s ability to choose for himself was perfect, not a weakness.

        And that ability, in order to be real and not a sham, had to include the freedom to choose evil. Therefore, in order for Adam to HAVE a choice, evil needed to be present in God’s perfect creation in some fashion. That is why God permitted Satan to enter His perfect creation in the form of the serpent. Did the presence of evil mar the perfection of creation? Evidently not, since God declared it “very good.”

        These things, as I have said, are a mystery — we cannot hope to intellectually comprehend them fully. As I’ve said many times, logic can only take you so far; eventually, you reach a point where you must accept what God says by faith. And it is faith, not logic, which leads to eternal life.

  3. Charwanists!

  4. When I consider perfection I am loathed to believe that it has the capabilities in it to cause harm. My ideas about perfection however are drawing in multiple ideas and this is not accurate to the definition of the term. A perfectly round sphere is not perfectly aware of its environment, but we don’t expect that because I am describing an inanimate object. With that same logic I must be self aware of animals and humans in the same way. Perfection in form does not mean perfection in understanding, even though I am perfectly capable of understanding that the misperception comes to my mind time and time again. Perfection does not mean that is unable to make poor decisions, nor does it describe the morality of the individual.

    I must always challenge my thoughts about terms and there usage. The reason is that we don’t want to steal from the awesome power of truth and apply it to our opinions, but to change our opinions so that they align themselves to truth.

    • Hello!

      Jomo says:

      “The reason is that we don’t want to steal from the awesome power of truth and apply it to our opinions, but to change our opinions so that they align themselves to truth.”

      Thanks for your thoughts on perfection, Jomo. You seem to express that someone (Adam?) can be perfect, yet able to make poor decisions. Perfect, yet able to make morally wrong choices.

      That is most interesting to me.

      I have thought many times that the world was made by God in perfection. But perhaps “perfection” includes a created universe that is a moral universe. A universe including good and bad, right and wrong.

      Thus, with this logic, a universe that was ONLY good and right would be imperfect. So God must have created the most perfect universe, and that universe is one with evil and good, wrong and right. God wouldn’t have created it otherwise!?!

      One verse of Scripture that has helped me form that opinion is Romans 11:32, which says

      “For God has bound all men over to disobedience so that he may have mercy on them all.”

      And related is 2 Timothy 1:9:

      “This grace was given us in Christ Jesus before the beginning of time.”

      That is; before Adam ever sinned, Christ had died for us. God knew. He made provision for us before time began. That is a perfect plan, for imperfect creatures made to live in a perfect and yet moral universe.

      Randy

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